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Black Feminism Introductory Research Guide: Film

This guide highlighting the works of Black women within the collections of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library. Created by Amara Green.

ABOUT

Please find below a list of films available to view at the Schomburg Center and NYPL at large, by and about Black women.

For more resources please follow the link to be directed to the Moving Image and Recorded Sound Division.

 

A MINOR ALTERCATION

The above video A Minor Altercation, accessed through the internet archive, dramatizes a real-life incident involving a fight between two high school girls--one white, one black-and then traces in parallel fashion the response of the two families to the incident, revealing the real feelings underlying racial tensions as well as the existence of common interests.

Director: Jackie Shearer

Year: 1977

The film is also available in the Schomburg Center's Collection: A Minor Altercation

HAIR PIECE: A FILM FOR NAPPYHEADED PEOPLE

Hair Piece: A Film for Nappyheaded People, is an animated satire on the question of self image for African American women living in a society where beautiful hair is viewed as hair that blows in the wind and lets you be free. Lively tunes and witty narration accompany a quick-paced inventory of relaxers, gels and curlers. Such rituals are all-too familiar to African American women-and indeed to all women confronted with an unattainable ideal of beauty. This short film has become essential for discussions of racism, African American cinema and empowerment. Used by hundreds of groups as diverse as museums, churches, hospitals and hair stylists.

Director: Ayoka Chenzira

Year: 1984

BLACK WOMEN AND FILM RESOURCES

FREE ANGELA AND ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS

DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST

Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed, and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902 on the Sea Islands off the coast of South Carolina it tells the story of three generations of Gullah women as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.

 

LOSING GROUND